Friday, July 31, 2015

John Whipple Agency, Pipestone, Minnesota

On June 8, 2015, Jeffrey Congdon sent me this photo of the John Whipple Agency in Pipestone, Minnesota. Here it is for your enjoyment:


Friday, May 15, 2015

Pruning of William Wilkinson and Huldah Godwin

(Note: This post discusses William Wilkinson, previously listed in the Whipple Genweb as a son of John Wilkinson and Rebecca Scott. John Wilkinson is a great grandson of Captain John Whipple, the earliest known "Rhode Island Whipple." Although just deleted from the Whipple Genweb, William Wilkinson's "pruned" descendancy tree can still be viewed in iWhipple.org by clicking "Advanced Search," selecting the "William Wilkinson" tree, and searching for Person ID 18348. That will take you to this page.)

Over ten years ago I encountered a book entitled Genealogy of Wilkinson and Kindred Families by M. M. Wilkinson (Shelby, Miss.: Shelby Book Store, 1949). I recall spending many days entering the Wilkinsons in that book into my database of Whipple descendants.

Many of the Wilkinsons in that book were in fact descendants of Captain John Whipple, who died in Providence, Rhode Island in 1685. However, during the past week I learned that William Wilkinson, Jr., who was believed to have been born in 1723 in Providence, RI, and died 1796 in Virginia, was actually the son of John Wilkinson born 1726. John Wilkinson came to Pennsylvania from Northern Ireland in 1733. 

In her email, Janice McAlpine noted the following:
This connection is well documented because William and his children, including Mary and Rebecca Connerly, were mentioned in various estate papers and family letters. (See, Descendants of Irish Immigrant John Wilkinson (1726-1806) William Amel Sausaman (1971), online at: <https://dcms.lds.org/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE919925>)  In addition, John Wilkinson's other documented children, including sons Jehu and Samuel Wilkinson, remained in close connection to William Wilkinson's children in Mississippi and Louisiana.  In fact, Samuel's estate documents listed William's children by name.
She continues:

I think some researchers mistakenly assumed that William's father was also named William because William was referred to as William Wilkinson Jr. in a document or two, but Junior didn't mean "son of" in those days. It just meant that there was a younger and an older man by the same name in the area. Sometimes the men weren't related at all. In this case, there was an older William Wilkerson in Duplin Co., North Carolina, but he wasn't William's father. 

At some point an overly enthusiastic researcher mistakenly attached William Wilkinson Jr. to William Wilkinson and Huldah Godwin of Nansemond Co., Virginia, and then on to the Whipples of Rhode Island. One of the books containing this mistaken connection is Genealogy of Wilkinson and kindred families, M.M. Wilkinson 1949. The book is not well documented even though it includes some occasional documents. Mostly, it just lists lineages with no proof. 

You may also want to look a little more closely at William Wilkinson and Huldah Godwin. Although this William's parents are often listed as John Jr. Wilkinson and Rebecca Scott, there isn't any documentation for this link. In reality, his father was William Wilkinson (Sr.) of Isle of Wight Co., Virginia, whose will, dated March 6, 1740, listed sons William and Willis. (See, Chapman, Blanche Adams, Wills and Administrations of Isle of Wight County Virginia, Books 1-3; Heritage Books, Inc.; Westminster, Maryland 2006.) These two sons were on records in Nansemond County and son William Wilkinson of Nansemond Co. was married to Huldah Godwin. 

William Wilkinson (Sr.) of Isle of Wight was connected to the Godwin family well before his son's marriage. They sold him land in 1725: Isle of Wight Deeds, Wills - Vol. 2, 1715-1726.p.709. "28 Jun 1725.... William Godwin and His wife , Ann Godwin, of Nansemond County to William Wilkinson of Isle of Wight.... one grist mill and 1 acre of land in the lower parish on Chucatuck Creek (being land bought by Col. Thomas Godwin from Samuel Ferment). Wit: Joseph Godwin, James Godwin and Richard Rudyard. William Godwin, Ann (X) Godwin." (See, William Lindsey Hopkins Isle of Wight County Virginia Deeds 1720 - 1736 and Deeds 1741 - 1749, Athens, Ga.: Iberian Publishing Company, 1994, p. 21. ) 

According to his marriage records, William Wilkinson (Sr.) of Isle of Wight was the "son of Henry Wilkinson of Nansemond Co. , decd." He married Rebecca Powell , daughter of Wm. Powell , of Isle of Wight Co. 21 day 9 mo. 1725. Witnesses- Robt. Jordan, Jr., Robert Scott , Elizabeth Scott , Wm. Scott (See, Edward Pleasants Valentine Papers, Abstracts of Records in the Local and General Archives of Virginia - Records of the Society of Friends Lower Virginia Meeting, 1673-1727, The Valentine Museum Richmond, Virginia.) 

I suspect Henry Wilkinson was related to the many Wilkinsons who were in Virginia by the mid-17th century. For a list see: Early Virginia Immigrants, 1623-1666, George Cabell Greer, 1912 < http://www.evmedia.com/virginia/ > In other words, I don't think there is any direct connection between this branch of Virginia Wilkinsons and the Rhode Island Wilkinsons.

After considering  the evidence, I decided to prune William Wilkinson and Huldah Godwin, and their descendants from the Whipple Genweb (at both genweb.whipple.org and iWhipple.org).

However, I didn't feel comfortable just deleting William and Huldah's descendants. I have therefore created a new "William Wilkinson" tree at iWhipple.org for the 1273 descendants of William and Huldah. You can visit William at iWhipple.org. If you select the "Descendants" tab on the page, you can see his descendants according to M. M. Wilkinson.

If you feel that I have pruned William and Huldah in error, please let me know.

-- Weldon Whipple, Webmaster, Whipple Website

(P.S. William previously appeared in the Whipple Genweb as the son of John Wilkinson (http://whipple.org/18333) and his wife Rebecca Scott (http://whipple.org/18332).)

Sunday, April 5, 2015

Dewey A. Whipple Reunion 2015 on new Whipple Reunions site

This past week I created a new Whipple Reunions site at reunions.whipple.org. It was just in time to announce the first known reunion of 2015--the Dewey A. Whipple reunion in June.

If you have a reunion to announce (and want it to appear on the Whipple Website), feel free to email the Webmaster (webmaster@whipple.org).

Let's keep our fingers crossed that the Whipple Reunions site is more successful than past sites!

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Recent Changes to the Whipple Website

During the past month I've made at least three modifications to the Whipple Website that might warrant mentioning.


Gravestone database

During January and February I experienced a deluge of gravestone photos in my inbox--so many that I was unable to readily identify incoming email about new Whipples, connections, dates, places, connections, etc. I decided that it might be time for a change.

Noticing that iWhipple.org has sections for Cemeteries and Headstones, I began to explore the feasibility of moving the Gravestone Database previously at whipple.org/graves to iWhipple.org. Not only was it feasible, but is is now a "done deal." The former whipple.org/graves now redirects to the Cemeteries page at iWhipple.org.

Within the next month I might authorize select individuals to post gravestone photos at iWhipple.org. (On the other hand, maybe we shouldn't compete with Find a Grave?)


Search tweaks

I've received feedback that many prefer iWhipple.org to genweb.whipple.org, including the search capabilities. About two weeks ago I modified the http://genweb.whipple.org/search.html search results list to include links to iWhipple.org as well as genweb.whipple.org.

We'll see where this all leads.


Reunions site

During the past 16 years--ever since the 1999 Ipswich Whipple reunion--photos of reunions have appeared in a variety of places on the Whipple Website: first in the directories beneath http://whipple.org/reunions, later in the photo gallery, still later in the Whipple Blog. It has gotten to the point where I'm unsure what to do when someone asks me to advertise their reunion.

In an effort to unify the miscellaneous treatment, the Whipple Reunions site is now online at http://reunions.whipple.org. Maybe the new site can tame the reunions monster!

Friday, March 27, 2015

Blaine Whipple, 1930-2015, Genealogist Extraordinaire: R.I.P.

I just received word that Blaine Whipple, perhaps the most prolific author of genealogical books on the Whipple Family, passed away on January 3, 2015. I will miss him! (Blaine's wife Ines Mae [Peterson] Whipple passed away last year, on June 5, 2014.)

You can read Blaine's obituary (published by The Oregonian) online. Ines' obituary is also available online.

Blaine contributed numerous pages to the Whipple Website:

He also sent photos of two reunions:
Some of Blaine's books on the Ipswich (Massachusetts) Whipples are featured at books.whipple.org. That site says to purchase his titles from BlaineWhipple.com, which seems to have gone dark?  Some are available at Amazon.com. As I confirm places to purchase his books, I will update this site.

There are undoubtedly more pages by Blaine on the Whipple Website.

(Blaine is in the Whipple Genweb at whipple.org/17687, also at iWhipple.org/17687. Updated information from his and Ines' obituaries should appear online in the next 3-4 days.)

Rest in Peace, Blaine Whipple!

(Special thanks to Ray Whipple for informing me of Blaine's death. Ray is the author of the book The Whipples of Ipswich and its Hamlet, featured on the Whipple Blog in 2009. Ray is in the Whipple Genweb at whipple.org/49296 and iWhipple.org/49296.)



Saturday, January 24, 2015

Thomas Whipple of Bishops Stortford Mentioned by Blaine Whipple

Today as I was trying to answer an email question, I stumbled (again) across Appendix One (pp. 958-1015) in the first volume of Blaine Whipple's monumental 4-volume work entitled 15 Generations of Whipples: Descendants of Matthew Whipple of Ipswich, Massachusetts, Abt 1590-1647 (Baltimore, MD: Gateway Press, 2007, ISBN 978-0-9801022-0-8 [volume 1 only]; ISBN 978-09801022-4-6 [4-volume set]).  While thumbing through its pages, page 969 caught my eye:
Thomas Whepill of Stortford, Hertford County, was involved in land transactions with Sir William Capell, knight, as early as 1515. Many Whipple families lived in Suffolk and Norfolk counties but apparently none of these ancient families migrated to the American colonies. Consequently, minimal research has been done on these other Whipple-Whapples families and a dedicated researcher might dfind a link to young John and Matthew, Sr.
This Thomas is the same person that physician William Wyman Fiske identified as the grandfather of Matthew, Sr.  Fiske's article, "The Whipple Family of Bishops Stortford, Hertfordshire: Proposed Ancestral Origin of Matthew Whipple of Bocking, Essex, and a Whipple Ancestral Line for Arthur Gary of Roxbury, Massachusetts," published in The Genealogist, vol. 20, no. 2 (Fall 2006), pp. 191-217.
When I first read Dr. Fiske's article in 2006, it was compelling enough to cause me to add Thomas and his son Thomas as ancestors of Matthew Whipple, Sr., of Bocking, Essex, England.

Anyone interested in pursuing further research of Whipple lines might want to read Blaine's Appendix One. It lists many (disconnected) Whipples! The information from Blaine's appendix, combined with the additional descendants identified in Dr. Fiske's article, might offer clues to create additional connections to early Whipples of England.

(See the Whipple Books website for more information about Blaine's book.)

[Note to self: Add Whipples in Appendix One to Disconnected Whipples page.]

Thursday, January 22, 2015

Resurrection of Whpple DNA site at dna.whipple.org

Recently members of the Whipple Website Facebook group (http://facebook.whipple.org) have shown increased interest in the use of DNA in genealogical research.

Several years ago the Whipple Website maintained a separate blog on the topic of DNA research, but as interest appeared to wane, we merged that blog's posts in with this Whipple Blog.

This evening I decided to pull those original posts out of the Whipple Blog and reconstitute the Whipple DNA site.

Although that site still has quite a few "loose ends," it will hopefully answer some basic questions asked by members of our Facebook group.

Visit the Whipple DNA site at http://dna.whipple.org.

(Note: Because of name server caching on the Internet, it might take up to 48 hours from the time of this post for your browser to display the new site correctly.)